Nhill Aviation Heritage Centre hosts car club

BACK IN TIME: Andrew Trenery and his daughter Alisa, 6, of Nhill, check out some of the memorabilia on display at Nhill Aviation Heritage Centre during the Studebaker
Midway Rally at the weekend. Picture: SAMANTHA CAMARRI

BACK IN TIME: Andrew Trenery and his daughter Alisa, 6, of Nhill, check out some of the memorabilia on display at Nhill Aviation Heritage Centre during the Studebaker Midway Rally at the weekend. Picture: SAMANTHA CAMARRI

NHILL Aviation Heritage Centre has hosted its first event since its official opening last month.

Victorian members of the Studebaker Car Club descended on Nhill for the Queen's Birthday long weekend.

It was the first time the town had hosted one of the club's rallies.

Nhill Aviation Heritage Centre president Rob Lynch said the visitors enjoyed the experience.

A mix of activities appealed to car and aviation enthusiasts, he said.

"People were in awe of the hangar because it is such a magnificent building.

"I don't think people expected such a beautiful hangar as what we've got."

The heritage centre was the venue for a lunch on Sunday.

It also hosted a show and shine which featured club members' Studebakers and cars and motorbikes from up to 30 other enthusiasts from Nhill and surrounding area.

"The entertainment was a tiger moth doing aerobatics," Mr Lynch said.

Tiger moth pilot Ross Kilner came from Robe to offer people the chance to take to the skies.

The itinerary included a visit to Jeparit's Wimmera Mallee Pioneer Museum's seventh annual vintage rally, and Rod and Maureen Warrick's car museum in Kiata.

"Rod specialises in collecting any Australian-made cars," Mr Lynch said.

Highlights of Mr Warrick's collection include classic Leyland motor vehicles.

"They were a fully Australian-made car back in the 1970s," Mr Lynch said.

"They made about 1800 of them and then they closed down."

Mr Lynch said the centre's next big ambition was to host an air show late next year.

"We want to get the word out about the contribution the Nhill and district people put into the Second World War," he said.

"More than 10,000 young Australians trained out here during those five years."

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