Horsham's Vic No-Till conference explores farming developments

BRAINSTORMING IDEAS: Wimmera farmers Brad Teasdale, Jono Alexander, George Hepburn and Greg Lees chat to guest speaker Jay Fuhrer during a break in the Victorian No-Till Farmers Association conference at the Grains Innovation Park in Horsham. Picture: PAUL CARRACHER

BRAINSTORMING IDEAS: Wimmera farmers Brad Teasdale, Jono Alexander, George Hepburn and Greg Lees chat to guest speaker Jay Fuhrer during a break in the Victorian No-Till Farmers Association conference at the Grains Innovation Park in Horsham. Picture: PAUL CARRACHER

FARMERS from across Victoria and interstate, including the Clare Valley and Wagga Wagga, attended the 12th annual Victorian No-Till Farmers Association conference in Horsham on Friday.

Association business manager Kerry Grigg said she was pleased with the response.

"It's great to have people coming from further afield," she said.

"It's about farmers helping farmers.''

The association started in the Wimmera but has not had its conference in the region for several years.

The association organises events, such as its annual conference, to give Australian farmers information on the latest no-till advances in farming.

United States Department of Agriculture district conservationist Jay Fuhrer was the conference's special guest.

The North Dakota native has been working in no-till farming conservation for 34 years.

"There is a perception that it takes a long time to build good soils, but this is not the case," he said.

"It's easy to accept degraded soils, but the difference is obvious over time.

"We have known about the physical and chemical aspects of soil, but not the biological side of soil.

"Better soil, better food, better health.''

No-till farming follows natural cycles to improve soil health, save money, reduce traffic strain on the soil, improve the environment and reduce the need for chemicals.

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