Kaniva College students do 40 Hour Famine

GOOD CAUSE: Kaniva College year nine students Louise Hobbs, Lachlan Buttigieg, Bianca Holland, Cally Shurdington and Sinead Kuchel get ready for the 40 Hour Famine with teacher Jen Tuckwell. Picture: SAMANTHA CAMARRI

GOOD CAUSE: Kaniva College year nine students Louise Hobbs, Lachlan Buttigieg, Bianca Holland, Cally Shurdington and Sinead Kuchel get ready for the 40 Hour Famine with teacher Jen Tuckwell. Picture: SAMANTHA CAMARRI

KANIVA College year nine students will go without food for 40 hours to raise awareness of poverty.

Teacher Jen Tuckwell said the class would start the 40 Hour Famine on Tuesday and raise money for World Vision Australia.

“It is something we do each year and the students were really enthusiastic about doing it,” she said.

“It is part of the community work we do and we will spend a bit of time in class talking about poverty.

“It’s about gaining a bit of perspective and learning to appreciate what they have.”

Mrs Tuckwell said most of the students were choosing to go without food for 40 hours.

“One student is also giving up talking for 40 hours, which will be a challenge,” she said.

“A few students are only doing 20 hours.”

Mrs Tuckwell said she would take part in the event as well.

She said it would be a good challenge for the students.

The famine will finish on Thursday with a class lunch of pizza and chips.

So far the students have raised about $300 for World Vision Australia.

“A few of them have been door-knocking around town asking for donations,” Mrs Tuckwell said.

The Kaniva students will join more than 300,000 Australian teenagers participating in the famine. 

Food, furniture, technology and social media are just some of the things that young people will give up in order to raise awareness and money for children living in poverty throughout the world.

World Vision Australia’s chief executive Tim Costello said it was great to see young Australians continuing to take action against poverty.

“After nearly 40 years, it’s heartening to see young people still motivated to tackle poverty and hunger head on by participating in the 40 Hour Famine,” he said.

“Hunger remains the number one health risk in the world.

“In Rwanda up to 43 per cent of children under five are chronically malnourished.

“This is why the 40 Hour Famine remains so important in helping to alleviate hunger and poverty.”

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