Goroke P-12 College students plant trees for cockatoos | Photos

WIMMERA students learned about conservation while helping protect the habitat of threatened species this week.

Goroke P-12 College students helped plant about 160 stringybark trees at Minimay during a Spring into Nature event on Tuesday.

Students also participated in dancing and boomerang-painting activities, which Barengi Gadjin Land Council members led.

Trust for Nature, Bank Australia, and Greening Australia hosted the event at the Bank Australia Conservation Reserve. 

Trust for Nature south west area manager Adam Blake – who is based in Horsham – said stringybarks were the preferred food source for the south-eastern red-tailed black cockatoo. 

The cockatoo is one of 13 threatened species recorded at the reserve.

Mr Blake said the day was a chance for students to learn more about the world around them.

“It was great to see these kids in action, not only having fun but also rolling up their sleeves to protect the environment,” he said

“As they grow up, they can be proud to know they have made a contribution to the survival of that magnificent cockatoo.”

The Minimay property is a 927-hectare private nature reserve, home to 270 animal species.

Trust for Nature and Greening Australia are helping the bank with a 10-year strategy that focuses on wildlife conservation, climate change resilience and community engagement.

Bank Australia corporate affairs head Fiona Nixon said the group was proud the reserve was helping to protect the Wimmera’s unique landscape.

“Our reserve hosts a number of important vegetation types for the region including wetlands, buloke woodlands and stringybar,” she said.

“Open days like this one provide a valuable opportunity for our staff to experience this unique landscape and better understand our work with Greening Australia and Trust for Nature to protect threatened species and habitat.”