Horsham police recorded one of the lowest offence rates in Victoria during Operation Furlong

WIMMERA police have praised the behaviour of drivers across the long weekend as they conducted then statewide Operation Furlong. 

Horsham Highway Patrol officers recorded 67 driving offences between Friday and midnight Tuesday while Northern Grampians Highway Patrol officers recorded 78 driving offences.

Their efforts were part of the five-day operation that saw police from across the state patrolling roads to provide a highly visible presence on all major highways, at country race meetings and transport hubs. 

The operation targeted dangerous drivers and focused on the key contributors to fatalities and serious injury crashes including speed, drink and drug driving, fatigue, seatbelt compliance and mobile phone use. 

Police recorded 9000 offences across the state during the operation. 

Speeding offences topped the statistics for both Horsham and Northern Grampians teams with 50 and 27 drivers respectively. 

Horsham police recorded the highest number of cyclist offences across Victoria with 11. 

There were no unlicensed drivers recorded during the operation in either area.  

Horsham Highway Patrol Sergeant Leigh Creasey said it was business as usual. 

“There was nothing that stood out for us,” he said. 

“There were no serious offences. 

“It's good to see everyone doing the right thing and behaving on the roads.” 

Halls Gap Sergeant Karen Bain said visitors flocked to the Grampians region for the long weekend. 

“Everyone was well behaved,” she said. 

“We have been out and about doing Operation Furlong, targeting speeding and drink drivers, but it has been pretty quiet.” 

Horsham police also recorded five unregistered vehicle offences while the Northern Grampians had three.

Kaniva Senior Constable Adrian Hoggett said he had stopped one drink-driver on the Western Highway along with several speeding drivers. 

Senior Constable Hoggett said people – during the spring carnival and at any time – should be careful and make good decisions.

“Make sure you are watching what you are drinking and don’t over indulge,” he said. 

“If you feel like you have had too much (to drink), stop and ask a friend to drive, or walk.” 

People caught doing the wrong thing faced significant penalties including on-the-spot fines of $622 for being drunk in a public place and $777 for being caught drunk and disorderly.