Life of a farmer the ultimate rollercoaster

RESPECT: David Jochinke says farmers don't want sympathy but "understanding that we do run businesses which are a huge part of the Australian economy."

RESPECT: David Jochinke says farmers don't want sympathy but "understanding that we do run businesses which are a huge part of the Australian economy."

Whenever you put your heart and soul into your passion, it drives your very purpose which, in turn, can make every event that you face either feel like a success or failure.

And when such passion grips you, it’s hard to step back and let circumstances beyond your control play out without the “why” or “if only” emotions consuming your waking thoughts, no matter how significant or not.

In many ways, this is the rollercoaster of anyone who professionally dedicates themselves to their career. But none so much as what our farmers feel most seasons, especially this current one.

Although it feels like we’ve been exposed to most of the farming equivalents of biblical plagues – mice, dry winter, stem frost, late hail and even heavy summer rain – these are all part of making each season unfortunately unique. 

And as such, each season is catalogued and remembered for such events which often capture the hardships and struggles, with hopefully the occasional larrikin anecdote thrown in. 

And, even with these challenges, the overall result for the season will be “OK”, depending on the season that we measure it against.

Now, it isn’t that us farmers ask for an easy ride, nor sympathy for the challenges that we face, as that is the task of all who love their occupation. 

It is as much some respect and understanding that we do run businesses which are a huge part of the Australian economy.

Businesses that are heavily exposed to what each season throws at us. 

That is why I am so passionate about being involved and why I am trying to give my energy and passion to making a difference.

As much as the one finger raised off the steering wheel as two utes pass or waiting a little longer to give way than the average city driver, the spirit of being a part of something that is bigger than your own business is truly something special. 

However, it is hard to take the emotion out of it when we have a deep connection with what we do  – and also when it’s your livelihood which is at stake. 

We do work in a great industry in which there are continuous challenges that we need to constantly manage and adapt. 

Sometimes, the tough events do outweigh the pleasure of the task.

But overall, there aren’t too many industries that are so embedded in our rural communities and give the satisfaction of production.

So, as the harvest rolls on and our thoughts finally get to end of year family celebrations, I hope on reflection there is some silver lining anecdote to the season. 

It hasn’t played out as an easy one, but at least we’re harvesting something and anything with four legs is well sought after. 

I hope that everyone stays safe over this busy period, and that we all get to enjoy a well-earned break in which to recharge and get ready to face whatever the next season has in store.