Construction starts on pipeline to supply Brim, Beulah and Woomelang with potable water

Bev Appledore and Leonie Atkin from WG & SF McPherson CRT Brim celebrated drinking water coming to the town. Picture: SAMANTHA CAMARRI
Bev Appledore and Leonie Atkin from WG & SF McPherson CRT Brim celebrated drinking water coming to the town. Picture: SAMANTHA CAMARRI

THE communities of Brim, Beulah and Woomelang are one step closer to receiving drinking water.

Pipeline construction for GWMWater’s $17 million Mallee Towns Drinking Water Project has started.

So far, 37kms of trunk pipe has been laid between Warracknabeal Water Treatment Plant and Beulah.

Once the project is completed, a total of 132km of pipeline will run from Warracknabeal Water Treatment Plant to Sea Lake, via Brim, Beulah, Hopetoun and Woomelang.

Brim, Beulah and Woomelang currently receive an untreated water supply that is not suitable for human consumption.

Yarriambiack Shire Council mayor Graeme Massey said it was great to see the project underway.

“I hope it’s on track and that it is completed without any hassle,” he said.

“I’m looking forward to seeing the project completed for the communities that will benefit from it.”

Cr Massey said it was important rural towns received the same services as their metropolitan counterparts.

“Every community in remote areas of the state wants to feel that they are treated the same as communities in Melbourne,” he said.

“Drinking water is an essential service, just like mobile phone coverage and recreational water.

“Hopefully it will help (the towns) attract more people in the future as well.”

GWMWater spokesman Andrew Rose said GWMWater currently supplied 29 towns with drinking water supply.

“After the Mallee Towns Project is completed in October that will be 32 towns,” he said.

“That means 90.68 per cent of urban customers receive a drinking supply which will increase to 91.86 per cent after the project is complete.

“The remaining towns 40 towns received a regulated – not for drinking – water supply.

“Residents in these towns rely on rainwater for drinking and food preparation.”

Upgrades to the plant will start soon to accommodate an additional four megalitres per day flow from the Lake Bellfield in the Grampians.

Once a township’s drinking (potable) water supply has been declared, water usage charges will increase to a potable water tariff. 

Wimmera towns without drinking water include Kaniva, Goroke, Apsley, Harrow, Marnoo, Glenorchy, Jung, Pimpinio, Yaapeet, Dooen, Kiata and Tarranyurk. 

Construction works on the pipeline are expected to be completed by October.