Trish Mills said a lot has changed at Kalkee Football and Netball Club

BIG FAN: Kalkee's Trish Mills is an avid supporter of the Kees. She has been at the club for 58 years and is a life member. Picture: ELIJAH MACCHIA
BIG FAN: Kalkee's Trish Mills is an avid supporter of the Kees. She has been at the club for 58 years and is a life member. Picture: ELIJAH MACCHIA

TRISH Mills made the first batch of fried chips in the Kalkee Football and Netball Club canteen and hasn’t stopped since.

Mrs Mills said when the new clubhouse was built at Kalkee, she offered to cook chips every home game. 

She said the secret isn’t how she cooks them, it’s how the club looks after the oil.

Mrs Mills was courted by Allan Mills, traditionally a Kalkee boy, but played for Jung Football Club in 1959 when the Kees were unable to field a football team. 

Mrs Mills said she was originally a Jung girl.  

“The next year Kalkee formed a team and I have been there ever since,” she said. 

“That was a very big deal because it isn’t often a club can get back to its feet after folding for a season.” 

Kalkee senior football team was different in the 60’s compared to the teams it has fielded in the modern era. 

Mrs Mills said when the team reformed in the 60’s it was on the bottom of the table for more than 10 years. 

“When we kicked a point it was like winning the game and when we kicked a goal it was like winning a premiership,” she said. 

Kalkee won it’s second ever premiership in 1974 against Natimuk, the first premiership came in 1948 against RSL Diggers. 

Mrs Mills said the Kees were cellar dwellers until the early 70’s. 

“They really did do a good job keeping the club going,” she said. 

“The times have changed a lot, back when we had children you would come to the footy then go home, feed the children and do the chooks and pigs. Now we have dinner at the club after the game and you don’t have to do all the chores when you get home.” 

Mrs Mills said Kalkee is a tight community, she said as an example, when the new clubrooms and changerooms were built all the work on it was voluntary. 

Mrs Mills said the club had someone from every trade who was able to help the club except for carpet layers or lino layers. 

“Something that is really surprising is families who leave for one reason or another always tend to come back,” she said. 

Mrs Mills was the first president of the netball team at Kalkee when the Horsham District league introduced the sport in 1966. 

“It was good really, it gave the girls a bit of an interest then. It snowballed from there, from seniors to senior and juniors and have all these grades now. It’s incredible,” she said. 

“It’s helped with the football club too because now they have these extra people coming and parents bringing kids along.” 

Mrs Mills is a life member at Kalkee. 

She said she was given the life membership for her work she had done throughout her 58 years at the club.